Grand Basset Griffon Vendeen

The Grand Basset Griffon Vendeen, or GBDV for short, is a medium-sized scent hound from France. Their name translates to “large, low, shaggy dog of the Vendee”. They stand at a height of 18 inches.

These dogs have muscular bodies covered with medium-length, shaggy coats that come in colors of black and tan, lemon and black, black and white, orange and white, tri-color, and fawn and black. Added to that, they are also known for sweet-face, long ears, mustache, and a beard.

Grand Basset Griffon Vendeens are working dogs, which means they have high energies and would require a great deal of exercise. They are best fit in homes that have large spaces and securely fenced yards. You need to have time for them if you want to own one, as they can be destructive when bored.

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Grand Basset Griffon Vendeen Statistics

Dog Breed GroupHound
Breed SizeMedium
Height15.5-18 inches
Weight40-45 pounds
Lifespan13-15 years

Grand Basset Griffon Vendeen Ratings

Energy level
Exercise needs
Requires attention
Playfulness
Trainability
Shedding
Grooming
Friendly with family
Friendly with kids
Friendly with strangers
Friendly with other dogs
Prey Drive

History

The history of Grand Basset Griffon Vendeens can be traced back to the 16th century in Vendee, France. They are one of the four griffon French hounds we know today and have gone through centuries of development.

These dogs are believed to have been developed from the Grand Griffon. They were mainly used for hunting wolves and deer.

For centuries, the dogs were considered one breed with the Petit Basset Griffon Vendeens, Grand Griffon Vendeens, and Briquet Griffon Vendeens. They were called that King’s White Hounds as they were all owned by King Louis XII.

It wasn’t until the end of the 19th century that the breeds were separated. Paul Dezamy then wrote a standard that is being followed until now.

By the year 1990, the first Grand Basset Griffon Vendeen, a male, was imported to the US. A year later, a female followed. This was repeated in the years 1992 and 1994. These four dogs are believed to have laid the foundation of the breed in the US.

However, though these dogs came early, it wasn’t until the year 2018 that the American Kennel Club fully recognized them.

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GBGV Temperament

Grand Basset Griffon Vendeens are independent, happy, and outgoing dogs. As common to working dogs, they are highly energetic and athletic. They would require exercise, mentally and physically, so they remain healthy and happy.

These dogs need a large space to run about. If you live in an apartment and want to own this dog, then you need to have a large and securely fenced yard for him to play and run. A bored GBGV can be destructive.

GBGVs also crave human interaction, and they can be very upbeat. Include them in your family activities to strengthen your bond. They are also great with children and pets, but because of their strong prey drive, they’re best in households without small pets.

These are not aggressive dogs and are sociable to strangers once introduced. But socialization is required to make them more well-rounded dogs.

As they have an independent streak, they can be stubborn and have a mind of their own. They need constant training, and you need to be firm to get them to listen to you.

 

Grand Basset Griffon Vendeen Care Requirements

  • Nutrition: Grand Basset Griffon Vendeens needs a high-quality and well-balanced diet. There are no special dietary requirements, but it’s best if you consult your vet for specific feeding requirements for your GBGV. High-quality ingredients are a must if you’re preparing home-cooked meals. You also need to make sure that you’ll only buy premium-quality dog food and dog treats if you place to get one. Just ensure that it is formulated to cater to your dog’s needs. Make sure that the dog food and dog treats don’t contain fillers, additives, by-products, and ingredients that your dog is allergic to. Consult your vet for the right caloric requirements, too, so your dog doesn’t get overweight.
  • Grooming: Grand Basset Griffon Vendeens have medium-length, shaggy coats that shed seasonally. They only need to be brushed weekly to remove dirt and loose hair and prevent mats and tangles from forming. However, during the shedding season, you might need to do this daily to keep shedding to a minimum. Apart from brushing, occasionally, baths should also be given to keep him looking clean and neat. The ears should be cleaned regularly to avoid ear infection. Don’t forget to trim their nails, too. Long nails can split and crack, which causes pain and discomfort to your dog.
  • Exercise: Grand Basset Griffon Vendeens are usually quiet indoors, that is, if they’re given the right outlet to spend off their energy. As these are working dogs, they need a great deal of exercise. You need to have a securely fenced area where they can run about as they please. They are happier if they spend time with their owner, so create activities or play sessions that you can do together and would exercise their minds and bodies.
  • Health: Grand Basset Griffon Vendeens are generally healthy dogs with a long lifespan if given the right care and nutrition they need. However, like many other dog breeds, there are certain conditions dog owners need to watch out. For the GBGV, epilepsy and leishmaniasis are your major concerns. This is then followed by the elbow and hip dysplasia. We encourage that you let your dog take some screening tests to detect problems early on your dog. Research about symptoms of the diseases, too, and closely monitor your dog’s behavior for any changes. Another great thing to do is to meet at least one of your dog’s parents to be aware of hereditary diseases your dog might acquire.
  • Lifespan: The life expectancy of Grand Basset Griffon Vendeens is 13-15 years.

Fun Facts about Grand Basset Griffon Vendeens

  • Grand Basset Griffon Vendeens originated from Vendee, France, centuries ago.
  • They only became a separate breed in the 1950s.
  • They were called poor man’s hunting dogs.
  • They were used for hunting wolves and deer.
  • They are trained to man-trail in the US and Europe.
  • Their name means “large, low, griffon dog from Vendee”.
  • They were fully recognized by the American Kennel Club in 2018.

Check Out Other Hound Dog Breeds:
Afghan Hound, American English Coonhounds, American Foxhound, Basenjis, Basset Hound, Beagle, Black and Tan Coonhound, Bloodhound, Bluetick Coonhound, Borzois, Cirnechi dell’Etna, Dachshund, English Foxhound, Greyhound, Harrier, Ibizan Hound, Icelandic Sheepdogs, Irish Wolfhound, Norwegian Elkhound, Otterhound, Petit Basset Griffon Vendéen, Pharaoh Hounds, Plotts, Portuguese Podengo, Redbone Coonhound, Rhodesian Ridgeback, Salukis, Scottish Deerhounds, Sloughis, Treeing Walker Coonhound, Whippet

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