Lowchen

Lowchens are adorable little dogs that stand at a height of only 13 inches. The Lowchen features a long silky coat that is usually clipped to a lion shape, giving them the nickname “lion dog”. The coat also comes in different colors and color combinations, including black, cream, black and tan, chocolate, black and silver, and blue.

Despite their nickname, Lowchens are not fierce dogs. It’s the total opposite as they are very playful and gentle, which makes them excellent family companions for both adults and children. They are people loving, so, naturally, they get along with everyone.

Lowchens are ideal pets for inexperienced and experienced owners alike. However, it’s important to note that you need to give them lots of attention if you want to own one. That means they can’t be left alone for long periods. In exchange for that, he’ll also shower you with lots of love and affection as they fill your homes with bright energy.

Lowchen

Lowchen Statistics

Dog Breed GroupNon-Sporting
Breed SizeSmall
Height11-13 inches
Weight10-15 pounds
Lifespan15+ years

Lowchen Ratings

Energy level
Exercise needs
Requires attention
Playfulness
Trainability
Shedding
Grooming
Friendly with family
Friendly with kids
Friendly with strangers
Friendly with other dogs
Prey Drive

Lowchen History

Where the Lowchens came from, have been a never-ending topic of debate. Historians can’t agree where they really originated.

One theory says that these dogs originated in northern Europe, either in Germany, Belgium, or France. Another theory says that these dogs are related to the Bichon breeds, and most probably came from the Mediterranean. Other theories say that these dogs are of Russian or Tibetan origin.

However, regardless of where these dogs came from, it’s undeniable that they have been companion dogs for hundreds of years. It’s also found that they have been loved by everyone, whether it’s the royalties or farmers. Their appearance also didn’t change through the centuries.

Sadly, as years passed, Lowchens are becoming less popular, and their numbers declined. By the end of the 19th century, there were only a few Lowchens left. Fortunately, a breeder, Madelaine Bennert, made it her goal to save the Lowchens from extinction.

Just as she was already successful, the breed was almost wiped out again during the two world wars. This time, Bennert got help from Dr. Hans Rickert to save the breed, and it was a success.

By 1971, the first Lowchen finally arrived in the US, and a few years later, the American Kennel Club recognized the breed in 1999. They are still considered rare, though, but they are already far from extinction.

Lowchen Temperament

Lowchens are affectionate, outgoing, and positive dogs. If you’re looking for an example of even-tempered dogs, Lowchens will surely be one of them.

They are very gentle dogs who love people and companionship. It’s essential to give them lots of attention and interaction to keep them happy. You shouldn’t also leave them alone for long periods, or they might suffer from separation anxiety.

These are peaceful dogs with everyone. This includes children and other pets. There are times where he’d love to watch outside the window to see if anyone comes so they can tell you – a very great trait for a watchdog.

Despite their size, Lowchens are also fearless dogs. They will challenge larger dogs if he sees the need for it, so be sure to supervise them.

These are not aggressive dogs, but socialization is crucial to get your dog accustomed to any new situation. This way, they will know how to react properly when introduced to someone new, whether it’s a person or an animal. It also helps them become more well-rounded.

Training may come easy for these intelligent dogs, though there may be cases that they can be stubborn. You need to be consistent and patient with them. Don’t treat them harshly no matter what.

It helps if you keep training interesting. Also, give them lots of positive reinforcements, so they feel good about following your orders.

Lowchen Care Requirements

  • Nutrition: Lowchens would need high-quality and well-balanced meals to stay fit and healthy. It’s best if you can ask your veterinarian for the best feeding requirements specific to your dog. Normally, meals should contain a balance of essential nutrients – proteins, fats, carbohydrates, and vitamins. You can get this from many resources, but you should make sure that you only buy high-quality ingredients. The same should go if you’re buying dog food or dog treats. With premium-quality dog food, you can ensure that it doesn’t contain fillers, additives, and by-products. These have low nutritional value and may also cause problems for your dog’s digestion. Stay away from those that contain ingredients your dog is allergic to. Make sure that you only provide your dog with the right amount of calories daily. Never provide too much or overfeed them as this may cause them to get overweight, and they become more prone to diseases.
  • Grooming: Lowchens are long-haired dogs. But this shouldn’t intimidate you as they are very easy to maintain. These coats shed infrequently and would need occasional brushing, so it remains beautiful and healthy. Baths can be given once every few weeks, depending on your dog’s needs. You can take him to a professional groomer once every few months to trim his hair and keep him looking neat. Nails and ears are two areas that you would need to check regularly. Clean out the ears every week to avoid ear infection, and trim the nails every two weeks, so it doesn’t get too long.
  • Exercise: Lowchens are lively dogs that would need their regular exercise. However, these don’t need to be high-impacting. Long walks with his owner and playing in a securely fenced yard should suffice. Let him join in family activities, and help stimulate their brain by giving them challenges.
  • Health: Lowchens are generally healthy dogs with a long lifespan. However, like any other dog breeds, they too are susceptible to specific health conditions. As dog owners, it’s crucial to be aware of what these are. For Lowchens, there are three diseases you need to watch out for: cataracts, progressive retinal atrophy, and patellar luxation. Screening tests should help in being able to determine these diseases early. They might also acquire genetically transferred diseases, so it’s still wise to meet at least one of your dog’s parents. Don’t forget to continuously monitor your dog’s behavior, too, and if there are noticeable changes, take him immediately to the vet.
  • Lifespan: The life expectancy of Lowchens is 15+ years.

Famous Lowchens

  • Freeway: The Lowchen featured in the TV show Hart to Hart in the 1980s.

Fun Facts about Lowchens

  • The Lowchen is an ancient dog that originated way back in the 15th century.
  • Their true origin is unknown, with people saying they came from Europe, the Mediterranean, Russia, or Tibet.
  • They are nicknamed as “Little Lion Dog”.
  • They had the Guinness Book of World Record for being the rarest dog in the world in 1960.
  • They are the symbols of bravery and courage of a knight in the 1500’s painting.
  • They have an amazing memory.
  • They were fully recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1999.

Check Out Other Non-Sporting Dog Breeds:
American Eskimo Dog, Bichons Frises, Boston Terrier, Bulldog, Chinese Shar-Pei, Chow Chow, Coton de Tulear, Dalmatian, Finnish Spitz, Keeshonden, Lhasa Apsos, Norwegian Lundehund, Schipperkes, Shiba Inu, Tibetan Spaniel, Tibetan Terrier, Xoloitzcuintli

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