Welsh Springer Spaniel

Welsh Springer Spaniels are medium-sized dogs known for their red and white coat that often comes with freckles. The Welsh Springer Spaniel coat is silky and comes in two types – straight or wavy – covering their whole bodies with the ears and tails lightly feathered, while the legs and chest are heavily feathered.

Welsh Springer Spaniels are often described to be of handy size. They are bigger than the Cocker Spaniels and smaller than the English Springers, which makes them a great dog for any living conditions.

Although beautiful dogs, it’s best to keep in mind that these are energetic dogs with a great deal of stamina. So, unless you can cope with this big energy, you may not be a great fit. And for those who are, you surely got yourselves great family companions who would always love to keep you happy.

Welsh Springer Spaniel Breed

Welsh Springer Spaniel Breed Statistics

Dog Breed GroupSporting Group
Breed SizeMedium
Height18-19 inches (male); 17-18 inches (female)
Weight40-55 pounds (male); 35-50pounds (female)
Lifespan12-15 years

Welsh Springer Spaniel Breed Ratings

Energy level
Exercise needs
Requires attention
Playfulness
Trainability
Shedding
Grooming
Friendly with family
Friendly with kids
Friendly with strangers
Friendly with other dogs
Prey Drive

Welsh Springer Spaniel History

Welsh Springer Spaniels were developed in Wales around the 13th century. Like many other spaniels that originated in Britain, like the English Cocker Spaniel and the English Cocker Spaniel, they were developed to be hunting dogs.

Many centuries ago, in Spain, all spaniels were called Cocking Spaniels, named after the function they performed. As the years went by, the dogs were divided into Water Spaniels and Land Spaniels. Welsh Springer Spaniels belonged to the latter.

According to early writing, the modern Welsh Springer Spaniel we see now have originated from a Welsh Cocker. This was also depicted in tapestries created during the Renaissance.

It was in the 1700s when Welsh Springer Spaniels became a favorite hunting dog by the nobles. However, by the 1800s, they were slowly replaced by English Springer and other spaniels.

The breed was recognized again during the Victorian period, and by 1902, they were recognized by Britain’s Kennel Club as a separate breed from the English Springer Spaniel. From being called Welsh Spaniels or Welsh Cockers, the breed’s name was finally changed to Welsh Springer.

It was in the late 1800s when the dog breed was imported to America. They immediately gained huge popularity and the American Kennel Club recognized them in 1906.

Now, the Welsh Springer Spaniels are still considered to be a rare breed. According to AKC, there are only about 300 puppies per state that are getting registered each year. But even if that’s the case, the breed still ranks 128th as the most popular dog breed in the US today.

Welsh Springer Spaniel

Welsh Springer Spaniel Temperament

Welsh Springer Spaniels are happy, reserved, and upbeat dogs, according to the American Kennel Club. Although less outgoing than the English Springer Spaniel, these dogs are hardy and energetic workers.

They most especially love the outdoors, which is why they’re best paired with active owners. Be sure to keep them entertained and provide them with a fair amount of exercise daily in the form of running, hiking, or biking.

If you’re able to provide them outlets where they can spend their energy, they become more well-behaved indoors. This time, you’ll be able to appreciate their love and devotion to their families. They are generally calm, which makes them excellent dogs for children.

Welsh Springer Spaniels are reserved with strangers or even with strange pets. You can expect them to bark when someone suspicious comes to your home. Because of this, early socialization is essential, so their suspicions wouldn’t lead to aggressiveness.

Early socialization will also help your dog become more well-rounded. Plus, it will help get them accustomed to new things.

Welsh Springer Spaniels are easy to train, but they can be very sensitive. You must teach them in a calm and gentle voice. Providing positive reinforcements is highly encouraged.

Welsh Springer Spaniel Care Requirements

  • Nutrition: Feeding a Welsh Springer Spaniel is not hard. The only thing you need to remember is to provide them high-quality and well-balanced meals. If you’re serving a home-cooked meal, make sure that you only buy high-quality ingredients. Ask your vet what the excellent sources of proteins, fats, and carbohydrates are, the essential nutrients for your dog’s growth are. If you plan on giving dog food, choose the ones that are of premium quality. Always check the label and stay away from those products that contain fillers, additives, and by-products. Fruits and vegetables are great to add to your dog’s diet. These are excellent sources of fiber and will aid your dog’s digestion. It’s also crucial to know what food ingredients your dog is allergic to so you can stay away from those.
  • Grooming: Welsh Springer Spaniels are known for their beautiful red and white coats that shed occasionally. They need at least once a week brushing to keep it neat. This will also help remove dirt, excess hair, and tangles. Baths can be given once a month, but be sure to use a gentle shampoo and conditioner. You also need to clean the ears to prevent ear infection. Nails should be trimmed regularly as well, so your dog won’t feel any pain and discomfort.
  • Exercise: Welsh Springer Spaniels are active and energetic dogs who need regular and lots of exercise. They are happiest when playing with their owners, so it’s best to create activities that you can do together. You can also take him out on long daily walks, but be sure to keep him on a leash. If you want to let him run around the backyard, be sure to have a secured fence or risk having a hard time chasing your dog.
  • Health: Welsh Springer Spaniels are generally healthy dogs. But like many other dog breeds, they are prone to some health conditions like hip dysplasia, entropion, and epilepsy. Dog owners need to be aware of these so you can easily monitor your dog’s behavior. We recommend meeting at least one of your dog’s parents so you can know if there are hereditary health issues your dog may get. Take your dog to regular check-ups or have him take some screening tests to detect certain diseases at an early stage.
  • Lifespan: The life expectancy of a Welsh Springer Spaniel is 12-14 years.

Famous Welsh Springer Spaniels

  • Corrin: The first Welsh Springer Spaniel to be photographed
  • Goitre Lass: A well-known Welsh Springer Spaniel that produced several champion pups

Welsh Springer Spaniel Dog

Fun Facts about Welsh Springers

  • Welsh Springer Spaniels were developed in Wales around the 13th century.
  • Contrary to common belief, Welsh Springers are not a variant of English Springer Spaniels.
  • They are one of the oldest Spaniel dog breeds.
  • These dogs were developed as hunting dogs.
  • They were originally called Land Spaniels until 1902.
  • They were recognized by the American Kennel Club in 1906.
  • They are a rare dog breed.

Check Out Other Sporting Dog Breeds:
American Water Spaniel, Boykin Spaniel, Brittany, Chesapeake Bay Retriever, Clumber Spaniel, Cocker Spaniel, Curly-Coated Retriever, English Cocker Spaniel, English Setter, English Springer Spaniel, Field Spaniel, Flat-Coated Retriever, German Shorthaired Pointer, German Wirehaired Pointer, Golden Retriever, Gordon Setter, Irish Red and White Setter, Irish Setter, Irish Water Spaniel, Kooikerhondje, Labrador Retriever, Lagotti Romagnoli, Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever, Pointer, Spinoni Italiani, Sussex Spaniel, Vizsla, Weimaraner, Wirehaired Pointing Griffon, Wirehaired Vizslas

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