Wirehaired Pointing Griffon

Wirehaired Pointing Griffons are medium-sized gundogs that stand at the height of up to 24 inches. These dogs accompanied hunters and were used as pointers and retrievers during the hunts. As their name implies, the body of the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon is covered with a wiry, double coat that somehow gives it a rugged appearance. They also come with a mustache, bushy eyebrows, and gleaming eyes.

For those looking for a versatile family dog, the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon is a dog breed you can consider. These dogs get along well with everyone, but they may require daily exercise to keep them happy.

Wirehaired Pointing Griffon Dog

Wirehaired Pointing Griffon Statistics

Dog Breed GroupSporting
Breed SizeMedium to Large
Height22-24 inches (male); 20-22 inches (female)
Weight50-70 pounds (male); 35-50 pounds (female)
Lifespan12-15 years

Wirehaired Pointing Griffon Ratings

Energy level
Exercise needs
Requires attention
Playfulness
Trainability
Shedding
Grooming
Friendly with family
Friendly with kids
Friendly with strangers
Friendly with other dogs
Prey Drive

History

The Wirehaired Pointing Griffon is a reasonably young breed that was only developed in the 19th century by a man named E.K. Korthals.

During the 1800s, huntsmen in Europe wanted a dog breed with great versatility, and Korthals, a Dutchman, was one of them. He started his work in the year 1874, producing three dogs who served to be the best lines of the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon breed.

There were no records, however, of what dogs he used in the crossbreeding, but many believed that he crossed an Otterhound with several Setters and Spaniels. Others also mentioned including a Pointer into the mix.

But regardless of which dogs he used, Korthals succeeded. He was able to produce a dog with a keen sense of smell and can point and retrieve on land and water. These dogs were named “supreme gundogs,” and they were able to win many hunter’s hearts.

The Wirehaired Pointing Griffon was imported to the US by 1887. Quickly after that, in the same year, the first of their kind was registered by the American Kennel Club.

Temperament

As highly energetic and athletic dogs, Wirehaired Pointing Griffons require daily exercise. They need attention and companionship. Being left alone inside the house for too long can bring out destructive behavior.

Wirehaired Pointing Griffons are friendly with everyone. But they are incredibly devoted and loyal to family. They also get along well with kids of any age.

With their great sense of humor, they can make you laugh, and this trait will remain even as they age.

Though these dogs are not aggressive, they can be aloof with strangers, especially if they were not socialized at an early age. They also get along well with other animals, but they can be notorious cat chasers.

Training them can be a challenge because of their independent trait. Plus, they are easily distracted. Food and treats are great ways to make him obey, so you might want to keep this trick up your sleeve.

Wirehaired Pointing Griffon Care Requirements

  • Nutrition: Like any other highly-energetic dog breeds, the Wirehaired Pointing Griffon needs high-quality food with a great balance of all essential nutrients. Proteins are vital for these dogs as it helps in building and supporting their muscles. Fats and carbohydrates are also crucial to supply them with energy. If you’re preparing your dogs a home-cooked meal, make sure that you only buy high-quality ingredients. Protein is best taken from an animal meat source, while carbohydrates can be taken from whole grains. You can add some fruits and vegetables as excellent sources of fiber and vitamins. If you want to buy dog food, make sure only to get the premium ones. Take note of the ingredients and avoid those that contain fillers and other harmful additives that may harm your dog’s digestive system.
  • Grooming: The Wirehaired Pointing Griffon’s body is covered by a harsh coat that you need to brush weekly (the least). This coat sheds seasonally so you won’t expect loose hair on your floor and furniture unless it’s shedding season, but brushing will help prevent mats and tangles from forming. When shedding season comes, it’s advisable to brush their hair daily. Baths can be given occasionally, depending on what their bodies need. However, you need to pay close attention to their ears and make sure that it’s cleaned regularly if you want to prevent ear infection. Nails should be trimmed regularly also. Long nails will cause discomfort and pain, and you don’t want your dog to suffer from that.
  • Exercise: Wirehaired Pointing Griffons are social animals that need lots of physical and mentally stimulating activities. They are not dogs for inactive persons because they need someone consistent and firm who can give them the required attention. Meeting their attention needs is very important to keep them healthy and happy. It’s also helpful in keeping him entertained, so they don’t wreck your home.
  • Health: Wirehaired Pointing Griffons are generally healthy dogs. But there are two common diseases that you, as an owner, need to watch out for – Progressive Retinal Atrophy and Hip Dysplasia. Other conditions are hypothyroidism, elbow dysplasia, and von Willebrand’s disease. As dog owners, you should be aware of these diseases and their symptoms. If you notice some visible changes in your dog’s behavior, you can schedule a check-up for them. There may also be some screening tests that your dogs can take for early detection and prevention.
  • Lifespan: The life expectancy of Wirehaired Pointing Griffon is 12-15 years.

Famous Wirehaired Pointing Griffons

  • Moustache I, Querida, Lina: The first Wirehaired Pointing Griffons developed by E.K. Korthals; produced the best lines of the breed
  • Odin: The Wirehaired Pointing Griffon of Prince Rainier III of Morocco

Fun Facts about Wirehaired Pointing Griffons

  • Wirehaired Pointing Griffons were created in the 1800s.
  • They were developed by a Dutchman named Edward Korthals.
  • These dogs were described as “Supreme Gundogs” because of their incredible versatility.
  • Their coat comes in various colors: gray, chestnut brown, roan, white and brown, and white and orange.
  • Their name refers to their coat that comes with a coarse, wiry texture.

Check Out Other Sporting Dog Breeds:
American Water Spaniel, Boykin Spaniel, Brittany, Chesapeake Bay Retriever, Clumber Spaniel, Cocker Spaniel, Curly-Coated Retriever, English Cocker Spaniel, English Setter, English Springer Spaniel, Field Spaniel, Flat-Coated Retriever, German Shorthaired Pointer, German Wirehaired Pointer, Golden Retriever, Gordon Setter, Irish Red and White Setter, Irish Setter, Irish Water Spaniel, Kooikerhondje, Labrador Retriever, Lagotti Romagnoli, Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever, Pointer, Spinoni Italiani, Sussex Spaniel, Vizsla, Weimaraner, Welsh Springer Spaniel, Wirehaired Vizslas

Don`t copy text!